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Psychological Projections!



WHAT IS A PSYCHOLOGICAL PROJECTION?


You may have heard of the term psychological projection before, but what does it actually mean? In essence, it is the act of attributing one's own unwanted thoughts and feelings onto another person. It can be a way to displace or avoid personal responsibility, and it often leads to misunderstandings and hurt feelings.


It can be a way of avoiding responsibility for their problems. Psychological projection is a defence mechanism that allows people to avoid guilt and anxiety.


If you've ever been on the receiving end of the projection, you may have felt like someone was always trying to control or change you, or if they were constantly putting you down. If so, then there's a good chance that you were being psychologically "projected on."



THE DIFFERENT TYPES OF PROJECTION


There are several different types of projection:


Displacing: this occurs when someone projects their own negative emotions onto someone else - often a family member or loved one.


Idealising: this happens when someone believes only good things about themselves while denying any fault to make oneself feel better about themselves.


Projecting blame: which is when someone takes responsibility for their actions and then blames someone else for the consequences.


No matter what type of projection it is, it's always motivated by a desire to avoid dealing with difficult emotions or situations.



HOW TO RECOGNISE WHEN SOMEONE IS PROJECTING


It can be hard to tell when someone is doing this, but there are usually a few key signs:

  • they will try to control your behaviour

  • they will try to make you feel guilty for their issues

  • they will also constantly compare you to other people

  • they will attack your character or personality

  • they will be overly critical of you


If you suspect that someone is projecting, it's important to have a conversation with them about it. explain calmly and clearly how their behaviour is affecting you. If they're receptive, you may be able to work through the issue together. However, if they're unwilling to listen or try to gaslight you, it's probably best to distance yourself from them.



HOW TO DEAL WITH SOMEONE WHO IS PROJECTING


Projection can be a difficult thing to deal with, but by remaining calm and avoiding reacting in an emotional way, you can help diffuse the situation and disallow the projector from having more power over you.


Listen to what they are saying and look for patterns in their behaviour.


It may also be helpful to talk to the person directly about what you are observing. Offer support and understanding, without taking responsibility for the other person's problem. Let them know that you are there for them, but that they need to deal with their own issues.


Encourage the other person to seek professional help if they are struggling with psychological issues. Projection is often a sign of deeper underlying problems that need to be addressed by a qualified mental health professional.


However, if the person is not willing to talk about their behaviour, it may be best to distance yourself from them.



THE BENEFITS OF RECOGNISING AND UNDERSTANDING PROJECTION


Understanding projection can teach us to have more compassion for others. If someone is projecting their own issues onto you, respond with understanding and kindness instead of anger or defensiveness.


Understanding how these people feel when they're projecting may help improve your relationship with them because you'll realise that these behaviours aren't directed at you - it's just easier for them than dealing with their problems in life head-on!


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